Maybe Our Documentation "Best Practices" Aren''t Really Best Practices

Kayce Basques, an awesome tech writer on our team wrote up a pretty amazing article about his experiences measuring how well existing documentation best-practices work for explaining technical material. Best practices in this sense can be well-known industry standards for technical writing, or it could be your own companies writing style guide. Check it out!

Recently I discovered that a supposed documentation "best practice" may not actually stand up to scrutiny when measured in the wild. I'm now on a mission to get a "was this page helpful?" feedback widget on every documentation page on the web. It's not the end-all be-all solution, but it's a start towards a more rigorous understanding of what actually makes our docs more helpful.

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Whilst I am not a tech writer, my role involves a huge amount of engagement with our tech writing team as well as also publishing a lot of 'best practices' for developers myself. I was amazed by how much depth and research Kayce has done on the art of writing modern docs through the lens of our teams content. I fully encourage you to read Kayce's article in-depth - I learnt a lot. Thank you Kayce!

About Me: Paul Kinlan

I lead the Chrome Developer Relations team at Google.

We want people to have the best experience possible on the web without having to install a native app or produce content in a walled garden.

Our team tries to make it easier for developers to build on the web by supporting every Chrome release, creating great content to support developers on web.dev, contributing to MDN, helping to improve browser compatibility, and some of the best developer tools like Lighthouse, Workbox, Squoosh to name just a few.