Hello.

I am Paul Kinlan.

A Developer Advocate for Chrome and the Open Web at Google.

3 predictions for the web and platforms in 2017

Paul Kinlan

Following on from my list of the things that I am [excited about on the web in 2017](/2017-exciting-times/) here are three predictions of things that I think will happen in 2017 based off reading tea-leaves and random musings of things that I have 0 direct knowledge of but I might do if I was 'them'.

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Paul Kinlan

Trying to make the web and developers better.

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Exciting times: 2017 and the web

Paul Kinlan

There are lots of things happening on the web, and this is just a small list of what excites me.

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Whither Flash. Now what?

Paul Kinlan

It's the end of the road for Flash and plugins on the web, what do we do now on the web?

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Experimenting with Cloud Functions for use in Web Push

Paul Kinlan

I’ve been building out a quick sample that lets you quickly hook up an web push with a simple cURL request. The principle being that I would like to get integrations with third party APIs that currently don’t support Web Push in any way. The thing about webhooks is that they are not standarised in any way other than you will most likely get a blob of data in a POST HTTP request, for example Travis CI application/x-www-form-urlencoded encodes the request data, whereas Github will just put a JSON object as the POST payload.

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Running Chrome on AppEngine

Paul Kinlan

It's possible in 3 simple steps

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2016: Chrome and Web Developer Relations year in review

Paul Kinlan

Thoughts on the year on the web for our team

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Seconds to HH:MM:SS.MS format

Paul Kinlan

This is mostly for future reference. I recently built a tool trims a video and I needed to convert from seconds to the time-code format that FFMPEG uses of hh:mm:ss.ms const secondsToTimeCode = function(timeInSeconds) { const zeropad = function(number) { return (number <= 9) ? `0{$number}`: number; } const hours = Math.floor(timeInSeconds / 3600) const minutes = Math.floor((timeInSeconds - (hours * 3600)) / 60) % 60; const seconds = timeInSeconds % 60; return `${zeropad(hours)}:${zeropad(minutes)}:${zeropad(seconds)}`; }; It worked well for what I needed.

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Screen recording on Android with getUserMedia and WebRTC

Paul Kinlan

Finally you can record your screen directly on Android via JS... well 'finally' is a strong word.

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Chrome on Google Home

Paul Kinlan

Welcome to the world of the headless web and a massive fudge

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Building a simple PubSub system in JavaScript

Paul Kinlan

In a recent project building a web push service I wanted to have my UI respond to application level events (semantically if you will) because there were a couple of components that require information from the system but are not dependent with each other and I wanted them to be able to manage themselves independently of the ‘business logic’. I looked around at lots of different tools to help me, but because I frequently have a heavy case of NIH syndrome and the fact that I think people can implement their own infrastructural elements pretty quickly, I decided to quickly knock-up a simple client-side PubSub service — it worked pretty well for my needs.

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Barcode detection using Shape Detection API

Paul Kinlan

The other week I talked about Face Detection via the Shape API that is in the Canary channel in Chrome. Now barcode detection is in Chrome Canary too (Miguel is my hero ;) Barcodes are huge! they are on nearly every product we buy. Even the much maligned QRCode is huge outside of the US and Europe. The barcode and the QRcode provide a simple way for you to bridge the physical world and the digital world by transferring small amounts of data between the medium and you.

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Ideas for web apps with FFMPEG and ffmpeg.js

Paul Kinlan

I recently built a Progressive Web App that takes a screencast from your Android device and then wraps the video in a device frame using FFMPEG.js like so: I also managed to sort out building ffmpeg.js so that with relative ease, create custom optimized builds of ffmpeg and run it in the browser. The two things together I think present a lot of opportunities to build some great new small Progressive Web Apps that push what we think the web is capable of with regards to manipulating audio and video.

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Building ffmpeg.js for Ubuntu

Paul Kinlan

FFMPEG.js is an amazing project and it helped me building one of my latest projects: Device Frame. It basically builds ffmpeg (with a good set of defaults to keep the size small — as small as it can be). If the default build doesn’t support the filters and encoders you need, then you will need to build it yourself. This is more of a note for me in the future, but this is what I did to get it working.

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Designing a Web Push Service

Paul Kinlan

As anyone who works for a US based company but lives in the UK knows, Thanksgiving is a wonderful time of the year. It is that point in the year when we can actually get work done without a barrage of emails hitting us in the morning and in the evening. This Thanksgiving free-time I wanted to knock a project off my to-do list that had been sitting around for a while: a generic web-push web-hook end point.

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Material colour pallette

Paul Kinlan

This is more for my own future reference and noodling with. I converted it from the aco file with https://github.com/websemantics/Color-Palette-Toolkit Pomegranate #f44336 Lavender blush #ffebee Pastel Pink #ffcdd2 Sea Pink #ef9a9a Sunglo #e57373 Burnt Sienna #ef5350 Cinnabar #e53935 Persian Red #d32f2f Tall Poppy #c62828 Thunderbird #b71c1c Vivid Tangerine #ff8a80

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Service Worker Routing

Paul Kinlan

Yesterday I posted about an update to my Service Worker caching strategy. If you look at my ServiceWorker you will see that there is more to it than just the fix I had to make for storing data in the Cache. I have also introduced a URL routing framework to simplify my logic in the service worker when dealing with different kinds of requests. For example, I don’t want to cache requests to Google Analytics or Disquss, and rather than make my onfetch handler a lot more complex, it was easier to be declarative about the routes that I wanted to manage and then control the logic for those independently from the other routes.

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My blog's Service Worker and Caching Strategy Part 2

Paul Kinlan

About 5 months ago I documented my Service Worker caching strategy and it was noted that it wouldn’t work in Firefox because of my use of waitUntil. It was also noted that, well, my Service Worker didn’t actually work. It worked for me or so I thought, but every so often on a new page you could see it error and then quickly re-fetch from the network. I made a number of changes to make the code more readable, however I didn’t solve the actual issue and it turns out my understanding of cache.

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GRPC + Google Cloud: Cannot find module grpc_node.node

Paul Kinlan

This is a note for how to fix the above error because it annoyed me!

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Face detection using Shape Detection API

Paul Kinlan

I was at the party of the Chrome Dev Summit and Miguel Casas-Sanchez on the Chrome team came up to me and said “Hey Paul, I have a demo for you”. Once I saw it, I had to get it into my talk. That API was the Shape Detection API that is currently in the WICG in an incubation and experimentation phase and is a nice incremental addition to the platform.

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Custom Elements: an ecosystem still being worked out

Paul Kinlan

I like Web Components. It has taken a long time to get here but things are moving in the correct direction with Safari shipping Shadow DOM and now landing support for Custom Elements. I’ve been thinking a lot recently about Web Components, that is custom elements, template, Shadow DOM and CSS variables, specifically I have been focusing some of my thoughts on custom element space and how this can play out on the web in the future because I believe there are lots of interesting possibilities with how the usage of them will evolve over time.

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