Performance and Resilience: Stress-Testing Third Parties by CSS Wizardry

Paul Kinlan
Available in: English (Original) Deutsch Français 日本語 मानक हिन्दी русский язык tiếng Việt bahasa Indonesia

Hace un par de semanas estuve en China para el Día del desarrollador de Google y les mostré a todos mi QRCode scanner, estaba funcionando muy bien hasta que me desconecté. Cuando el usuario estaba fuera de línea (o parcialmente conectado), la cámara no se iniciaría, lo que significaba que no podía ajustar los códigos QR. Me tomó una edad para averiguar qué estaba pasando, y resultó que estaba arrancando la cámara por error en mi evento onload y la solicitud de Google Analytics se bloqueó y no se resolvió de manera oportuna. Fue este compromiso el que lo arregló.

Because these types of assets block rendering, the browser will not paint anything to the screen until they have been downloaded (and executed/parsed). If the service that provides the file is offline, then that’s a lot of time that the browser has to spend trying to access the file, and during that period the user is left potentially looking at a blank screen. After a certain period has elapsed, the browser will eventually timeout and display the page without the asset(s) in question. How long is that certain period of time?

It’s 1 minute and 20 seconds.

If you have any render-blocking, critical, third party assets hosted on an external domain, you run the risk of showing users a blank page for 1.3 minutes.

Below, you’ll see the DOMContentLoaded and Load events on a site that has a render-blocking script hosted elsewhere. The browser was completely held up for 78 seconds, showing nothing at all until it ended up timing out.

Leer publicación completa.

Te animo a leer el post porque hay mucha información excelente.

Paul Kinlan

Trying to make the web and developers better.

RSS Github Medium