Hello.

I am Paul Kinlan.

A Developer Advocate for Chrome and the Open Web at Google.

The Lumpy Web

Paul Kinlan

Wrinkles, Crinkles and lumpy bits.

Read More

Thoughts on the Credential Management API

Paul Kinlan

Entering usernames, emails, identifiers and passwords is a massive pain for users. It’s even worse on mobile as the use has to fiddle around with. Browsers have done a number of things over the years to help with this problem. We started with enhancing autofill across browsers by making it more intelligent, more secure but more importantly synchronised across browsers (so that if you enter data on your desktop it is available instantly on your mobile).

Read More

An organizer's perspective on Progressive Web App Dev Summit

Paul Kinlan

TL;DR - Went well. Lots to learn.

Read More

Ephemeral social or content networks

Paul Kinlan

If there is no one around to read your tweet, does it make a difference?

Read More

Testing Podcast

Paul Kinlan

This is a test. It might not look like much but I have integrated WebTorrent streaming in to my blog and bit torrent URLs so that I can distribute content across the web without relying on my site. It does use the WebSeed BEP so that it always has an unchocked seed (my site). I am going to start experimenting a little more with this to see how to measure analytics etc.

Read More

My blog's Service Worker and Caching Strategy

Paul Kinlan

Service Worker gives you control. Service Worker offers me as a developer great power and flexibility when creating sites and managing how I can make them fast and resilient to network issues. Because of the flexibility that the Service Worker API offers in terms of control over the network there are a lot of choices that you have to make when managing and this could be daunting the first time that you start to play with the API.

Read More

Serverless Data Sync in Web Apps with Bit Torrent

Paul Kinlan

TL;DR - Here is a demo Code Our team has built a lot of Progressive Web Apps recently to demonstrate how we think they can be built: Airhorner, Voice Memos, Guitar Tuner, SVG-OMG are a few that spring to mind. One thing that is common across all of these sites is that they have no server component to store and synchronise data. We built these sites as examples and reference implementations of the types of experiences that we can deliver on the web, they were never intended to be full “Apps” that you would build as a business.

Read More

Notification test page

Paul Kinlan

Feel free to ignore.

Read More

What were the UX issues with Web Intents?

Paul Kinlan

A question came up the other day in the office: “Everyone keeps saying Web Intents died because of the UX, but no one has actually said what the issues were”. I looked back over a bunch of my notes and blog posts and it’s correct, I don’t think we documented the holistic set of UX issues that we faced. Wide array of actions and data types We never optimized for the user intent and all were treated equally: Sharing == Viewing == Picking == Editing == Any other intent, and this caused a number of issues.

Read More

Inline web-page Android intent fallback detection

Paul Kinlan

Web Push is great, however if the user already has an app installed that does Push notifications the developer needs to reasonably be able to stop either the app or the web sites notification. However there is no shared ID between site and app (for obvious reasons). There are a couple of strategies that we are experimenting with right now. One of strategy is to try and launch an app and if it is not installed use the web experience.

Read More

Every browser should support a style of 'intent:' URL syntax

Paul Kinlan

The URI is a handy thing, it’s kind of like a Command Line Interface. A URI lets you target a site or an app and pass it data and then see a result in some form. Nearly everyone will know and understand that to load a web page we enter http:// or more recently (and more importantly) https://, but Apps can also be targeted directly with a custom form of the ‘https’ prefix called a custom scheme.

Read More

Launch an Android app from the web and cleanly fallback to web

Paul Kinlan

I was writing about Service Discovery the other day and I have some thoughts about how we can do inter-app communication on the web more effectively than what we can today. Interactions between web and web, web and apps and apps and web is something that many of you may know that I am passionate about, but it is incredibly hard and using the intent syntax in Android is a great start but has huge problems because it is not portable.

Read More

Service discovery and app interactions on the web

Paul Kinlan

It's not a pretty picture, but we have some solutions

Read More

Quickly capturing screen recordings from an Android device

Paul Kinlan

I have a little script that I use to keep me sane

Read More

Triggering a native Share intent on Android from the web

Paul Kinlan

This story starts a long time, was tickled into existing after I visited FlipKart in Bangalore and was finalized after an internal conversation about the fact that it is impossible to trigger the share dialog in Android from the web. Lots of people want it, it turns out everyone thought it wasn't possible. It is.*

Read More

Rise of the meta-platforms and the new 'web browser'

Paul Kinlan

Web Developers. It's a long road ahead

Read More

There is no spoon: Why I still say Mobile

Paul Kinlan

You say Mobile, I say 'Mobile X'.

Read More

Be Instant and Engaging on the mobile web - Google for Mobile India

Paul Kinlan

I've spent this week in India doing more research about Web Development in India and how mobile is changing that. Publically at least it is not rosey, app development and app thinking is very high whislt building for the web with mobile in mind is very low.

Read More

The future of the web on mobile from Coldfront Conf

Paul Kinlan

The web is changing, we need to adapt

Read More

Using Service Worker for server-side adaption based on network type

Paul Kinlan

On the web determining and adapting to network type the user is on is incredibly hard. Until now.

Read More